Essay Tips: How to Write a Thesis Statement

When I was in graduate school I spent a lot of time going to workshops on how to write a thesis proposal. None helped me jumpstart the thesis proposal writing process. Usually after a workshop I felt more overwhelmed than I did before attending.

[…] “How to write a thesis (Bachelor, Master, or PhD) and which software tools to use” –  […]

Translations: (thanks to Chen Feng) | (thanks to Marcelo Cruz dos Santos) | (thanks to Sergey Loy) | How to write a PhD thesis? This is not a trivial task. Related literature needs to be found, notes need to be taken and finally the thesis has to be drafted and written including the creation of the bibliography. Dozens of books exist about how to do a literature survey and how to write a PhD and scholarly literature in general (e.g. [1-9]). However, software tools that might help in doing a literature survey or writing a thesis are hardly covered by these books, if at all. This is surprising as many software tools exist facilitating the daily work of a PhD student. In this tutorial we present a new method to reviewing scholarly literature and drafting a PhD thesis with mind mapping software, PDF readers and reference managers. What makes this tutorial special is the fact that everything – PDF files, the content of PDFs (bookmarks) and references are integrated with mind mapping and word processing software. To make the tutorial better understandable we provide many examples for which we assume that you want to write a PhD thesis about academic search engines. Please note that


How to Write a Thesis | The MIT Press

HOW TO WRITE A THESIS

So why didn’t How to Write a Thesis come out in English in the aftermath of The Name of the Rose, when everything from Eco’s own thesis to his newspaper columns were being translated? I don’t know for certain, but the arrival (not to say invasion) of the personal computer on college campuses may have been a factor.


How to Write a Thesis remains valuable after all this time largely thanks to the spirit of Eco’s advice. It is witty but sober, genial but demanding—and remarkably uncynical about the rewards of the thesis, both for the person writing it and for the enterprise of scholarship itself. . . . Some of Eco’s advice is, if anything, even more valuable now, given the ubiquity and seeming omniscience of our digital tools . . . . Eco’s humor never detracts from his serious intent. And anyway, even the sardonic pointers on cheating are instructive in their way.”—Scott McLemee, Inside Higher EducationThis is the second part of our tutorial about how to write a thesis. In this part we cover how to structure and draft your thesis. There is lots of good literature on how to structure a thesis conceptually, so we will not cover this aspect in here. However, we will show you a practical way to devise, maintain and store the structure of your thesis in a mind map.