Free Thesis Statements on Malaria - Thinking Made Easy

The suspension of community bednet distribution strategy has had negative effects in household. There is systematic decline in number of bednets at household in which case many more people are exposed to anopheles mosquito which transmits malaria parasites. This is consequently leads to increased number of people suffering and dying from malaria which would have been prevented. The gains that the area achieved in previous years when it had community bednet intervention are being lost. It is morally unethical to provide free treatment of malaria when some of the cases would have been avoided, prevention is supreme and the communities should not only be considered for free treatment. The study shows that high bednet coverage is important factor to achieve significant reduction in malaria morbidity and mortality. Most successfully malaria programmes in the world have advocated and combined both mass distribution of nets and provision of free treatment of malaria. The use of insecticide treated bednets is instrumental in prevention of malaria among the people. Providing nets to at risk groups offer partial protection because majority who might be reservoirs for malaria parasites are exposed. There is likelihood to achieve meaningful results in fight of malaria if majority of the people are sleeping under net rather than as the case being advocated now. The policy of ITN distribution should be re-considered so that majority of the people are offered an opportunity to protect them from malaria. Prevention is better than cure.
The following questions require some further investigations and answers, the communities have been puzzled at the closing community distribution strategy and therefore asking some of these questions.
When can we achieve more in reducing malaria among the population in malaria endemic areas when we target a few or when majority of the people are reached with prevention methods? Is it economical to provide free treatment with ACT to adults in management of malaria whilst they denied an opportunity to access the long lasting nets which they are willing to buy to protect themselves from mosquito and malaria? Is it ethical to promote a healthy behaviour like sleeping under net which depends on service availability when at the same time the service is withdrawn? Did National Malaria Control Programme make wide consultations with communities before the actual change of distribution strategy?

Malaria affects the health and wealth of nations and people in every part of the world

The suspension of community bednet distribution strategy has had negative effects in household. There is systematic decline in number of bednets at household in which case many more people are exposed to anopheles mosquito which transmits malaria parasites. This is consequently leads to increased number of people suffering and dying from malaria which would have been prevented. The gains that the area achieved in previous years when it had community bednet intervention are being lost. It is morally unethical to provide free treatment of malaria when some of the cases would have been avoided, prevention is supreme and the communities should not only be considered for free treatment. The study shows that high bednet coverage is important factor to achieve significant reduction in malaria morbidity and mortality. Most successfully malaria programmes in the world have advocated and combined both mass distribution of nets and provision of free treatment of malaria. The use of insecticide treated bednets is instrumental in prevention of malaria among the people. Providing nets to at risk groups offer partial protection because majority who might be reservoirs for malaria parasites are exposed. There is likelihood to achieve meaningful results in fight of malaria if majority of the people are sleeping under net rather than as the case being advocated now. The policy of ITN distribution should be re-considered so that majority of the people are offered an opportunity to protect them from malaria. Prevention is better than cure.
The following questions require some further investigations and answers, the communities have been puzzled at the closing community distribution strategy and therefore asking some of these questions.
When can we achieve more in reducing malaria among the population in malaria endemic areas when we target a few or when majority of the people are reached with prevention methods? Is it economical to provide free treatment with ACT to adults in management of malaria whilst they denied an opportunity to access the long lasting nets which they are willing to buy to protect themselves from mosquito and malaria? Is it ethical to promote a healthy behaviour like sleeping under net which depends on service availability when at the same time the service is withdrawn? Did National Malaria Control Programme make wide consultations with communities before the actual change of distribution strategy?


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More than 75% of the total area of Ethiopia is malarious, making malaria the leading public health problem in Ethiopia

Falciparum malaria is a complex disease with a broad clinical spectrum. Several pathophysiologic changes are involved in the disease process. Yet, in the complicated chain of events, these pathophysiologic phenomena are not specific and may be found in other acute inflammatory diseases. One of the most important effects of Plasmodium falciparum infection is capillary endothelial damage, which causes increased vascular permeability leading to an impairment in the microcirculation. Hemodynamic alteration, hematologic change, and immunologic response are among the major pathophysiologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on these mechanisms, renal involvement in falciparum malaria therefore varies widely. Disturbances in the renal microcirculation are responsible for acute renal failure; massive intravascular hemolysis causes hemoglobinuria with or without renal failure; and immunologic reaction to parasites accounts for glomerular lesions. In addition, fluid and electrolyte disorders may result from the nonspecific effect of fever. In this paper, the clinical spectrum of renal manifestations, renal pathologic changes, and pathogenesis will be presented.