Martin Luther and the 95 Theses in Claymation

To combat abuses in the church of his day, the young German monk drafted nearly a hundred propositions for public debate. Martin Luther posted these "theses" on the church door in Wittenberg, an action that helped to give birth to the Reformation. Nearly everyone has heard of the Ninety-Five Theses, but few have read it. "This is such a crucial text," writes editor…

Martin Luther nailing the 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg church.

Johann von Staupitz, Luther's superior, concluded the young man needed more work to distract him from pondering himself. He ordered the monk to pursue an academic career. In 1507 Luther was ordained to the priesthood. In 1508 he began teaching theology at the University of Wittenberg. Luther earned his Bachelor's degree in Biblical Studies on 9 March 1508 and a Bachelor's degree in the Sentences by Peter Lombard, (the main textbook of theology in the Middle Ages) in 1509. On 19 October 1512, the University of Wittenberg conferred upon Martin Luther the degree of Doctor of Theology.


Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

Martin Luther – “Here I Stand” (A Reenactment of Martin Luther before the Diet of Worms)

Martin Luther nailed the 95 theses to the church door at Wittenburg to promote a debate about the practices of the church at the time.


, 1493–1555, German Protestant reformer. In 1521, Jonas, then a professor at the Univ. of Erfurt, accompanied Martin Luther to the Diet of Worms. During their intimate friendship Jonas assisted Luther with the translation of the Bible.To combat abuses in the church of his day, the young German monk drafted nearly a hundred propositions for public debate. Martin Luther posted these "theses" on the church door in Wittenberg, an action that helped to give birth to the Reformation. Nearly everyone has heard of the Ninety-Five Theses, but few have read it. "This is such a crucial text," writes editor Stephen J. Nichols, "that it deserves to be read widely." He has written an illuminating introduction and many explanatory notes (conveniently located on facing pages), putting Luther's classic statement in everyone's reach. "Martin Luther has left a legacy that continues to enrich the church through his writings ...," writes Nichols. "All of this may be traced back to the last day in October 1517 and the nailing of the Ninety-Five Theses to the church door."