1. Analyze the question simply by circling all the important words.

Think about it. If you want to find answers, shouldn't you be interested in the question you're asking? As mentioned, a thesis represents a 'journey of knowledge' for the writer and the reader. Selecting a question that will keep you engaged will only reflect well on the work that you complete for the thesis.

In your thesis defense, the questions will consist of the following types:

Almost all assignments, no matter how complicated, can be reduced to a single question. Your first step, then, is to distill the assignment into a specific question. For example, if your assignment is, “Write a report to the local school board explaining the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class,” turn the request into a question like, “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?” After you’ve chosen the question your essay will answer, compose one or two complete sentences answering that question.


2. Be careful not to write a good response to the wrong question.

1. Analyze the question simply by circling all the important words.

(2) These sentences not only perform the functions described in the questions, they introduce and explain key dates and terms (disfranchisement, Reconstruction, economic crisis, 1890s, etc.)